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News About Mercury

A collection of stories that owners should hear about including recalls, lawsuits, investigations, and top complaints. Like many automakers, Mercury has been in the news for dangerous Takata airbag recalls.

Ford Doesn’t Want to Recall 2.7 Million Takata Inflators

[Ford and Mazda] have petitioned the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) to be exempted from the Takata recall. Unlike the tens of millions of airbag inflators already recalled in millions of vehicles, the 2.7 million inflators have a drying agent (desiccant) called calcium sulfate used to protect the explosive chemical, ammonium nitrate, from moisture.

Takata initially thought these inflators were safe, but further testing revealed problems. Given the dangers Nissan did the smart thing and accepted the recall right away. Ford, meanwhile, wants more even more testing. That means owners of the 1st generation Milan are their crash dummies.

First Generation Milan Included in Growing Takata Recalls

Ford Motor Company announced it will recall 816,000 vehicles with dangerous Takata airbags, including the 2006-2008 Mercury Milan.

Each vehicle needs new passenger-side frontal airbag inflators.

The recall starts in Zone B locations, which include:

“Arizona, Arkansas, Delaware, District of Columbia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia.”

Additional recalls will also be done in the following:

“Alaska, Colorado, Connecticut, Idaho, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, New Hampshire, New York, North Dakota, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Utah, Vermont, Washington, Wisconsin and Wyoming.”

Plaintiffs Say the Cracked Rear Panel Lawsuit is More Than Just Looks

The plaintiffs argue Ford is trying to “redefine” the claims by making the alleged problem less serious than it is, calling the cracks a simple cosmetic problem. Although Ford says there is a “propensity of the applique to crack,” the plaintiffs say there have been dangerous consequences from the cracked rear panels.

On the surface, cracked rear panels might seem like a cosmetic issue but owners know there’s more than meets the eye. The split panels let water seep in and corrode underlying components. The inevitable rust and swelling can damage the rear wiper motor and lead to shattered rear windows. It’s a mess that Ford should try to clean up, not just sweep under the rug with semantics in court.

Class-Action Lawsuit Wants Ford to Do Something About Their Cracked Rear Panel Problem

The affected SUVs named in the cracked tailgate lawsuit are the 2002-2005 Ford Explorer, 2002-2005 Mercury Mountaineer and the 2003-2005 Lincoln Aviator. The lawsuit alleges that even though Ford sold millions of those SUVs, consumers might not have purchased the SUVs if the defect had been known.

The cracked rear panel is a widespread issue in the 2nd generation Mountaineer, as well as the Ford Explorer and Lincoln Aviator.

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